About ModelEngine.com

ModelEngine.com was created by Randy Linsalato to promote Model Airplane Engines and the Hobby of Gas or Glow type Model Airplanes, Boats and Cars.

Model Engine Corp of America is Randy's company and is the oldest and largest producer of Model Engines in the United States.

Randy has been in the model engine business over 35 years...

In early 1980 RJL Industries was started by Randy J. Linsalato with the purchase of the Kraft .61 engine from Kraft Systems, Inc. Randy's business prior to this was the rental of motorcycles to the movie industry in southern California. Randy was a modeler during his teenage years and when he learned of the Kraft engine line being available for sale he thought it would be an interesting business.

The RJL K.61 became available that year also in 1981 the T.61 was advertised, the T.61 Swirle Schnuerle was the prototype for the Kraft engine designed by Rodger Thieabold hence the "T" designation. The T.61 never made it to market and only a few were made.

The following is a time line of MECOA & RJL's engine company aqusitions and releases...

1982 > RJL purchased the Testor McCoy series 21 engine line which was sold in small numbers as the B Series (B for beginer) .20 - .29 - .35 - .40

1982 > RJL purchased the Taipan .40 tools and marketed small numbers as the T.40

1983 > RJL bought all rights and tooling to the HGK line of engines from Japan and moved it to So. California

1986 > RJL bought the D.E.W. or Kustom .51 as it was later known from Ray Kasolot

1987 > RJL aquired all the Holland Hornet .049 and Johnson tooling as well and the Atwood .049 and Gilbert tooling.

1988 > RJL purchased the Forster and Remco engine lines from Ralph Mroch and proceeded to make the Forster .29 and .35 in Glow and ignition and also the Remco .29

1989 > RJL bought all rights and tooling to the HB line of engines from Germany and moved it to So. California

1989 > RJL bought the Cox Conquest engine line from K&B Manufacturing and marketed it as the C.15

1990 > RJL bought all rights and tooling to the HP line of engines from Austria and moved it to So. California

1992 > RJL brings out the Forster 99 from the original tooling bought in 1988

1993 > RJL Industries started MECOA, Model Engine Company of America. MECOA’s primary function was to be a direct mail order marketing company, this later changed as the corporate name and ModelerDirect became the mail order side of MECOA.

1994 > RJL bought all rights and tooling to the BUCO line of engines from Germay and moved it to So. California

1995> RJL produced the MECOA .61 which was from the Mutunuc .61 engine. RJL bought the rights and tooling for the Mutunuc .61 when the company in Taiwan closed.

1996 > RJL bought all rights and tooling to the ME line of engines from Isle of Man (England) and
moved it to So. California

1997 > RJL bought all rights and tooling to the MERCO and AM line of engines from England and moved it to So. California

1997 > RJL bought the tooling and rights to the Bantam twin.

1998 > RJL aquired the tooling and rights to the Ross twin, four and six cylinder engines.

1999 > RJL bought all rights and tooling to the FUJI line of engines from Japan and moved it to So. California

1999 > MECOA bought K&B Manufacturing in its entirity and moved it to So. California. With K&B came the rights to VECO, Torpedo and FURY engines.

2001 > MECOA bought the Perky engine from a private party/

2004 > MECOA bought the Anderson Spitfire project from Marvin Miller.

2005 > MECOA bought the Hayward/Connelly Thunderbird .65 engine.

2007 > MECOA bought Shuwa Industries of Japan. Randy's long time friend Mr. Tsuno passed away in his eary 60's. Sadly the family could not continue the business mainly because one of their customers here in the US filed bankrupcy oweing them $100,000.00

2013 Webra Engines of Germany

 

These are original engines produced by RJL

1982 RJL produced the Edco Sky Devil for T&C engineering. Quantity of 200 units.

1983 RJL produced the F.61 which was an aliuminum bore, chrome piston design. This was displayed at Long Beach and Toledo show. Randy knows this engine inspired the K&B Sportster design.
Only about 6 of these engines were made. Also produced were prototypes of an opposed twin, four and six using the same cylinder jugs.

1986 RJL produced and qualified a .65 target drone engines for the army. Only about 12 engines were produced.

1995> RJL brought out the MECOA .40 & .46

1996 RJL produced the Mammoth 3.4 cu in engine in a limited production of only 20 units. The problem with production was an addiquate ignition system.